Share Skills at MAN Up Skillshare Summit! Madison WI 8/22-8/28

Hello!summit2

From August 22-28 Mutual Aid Networks will be hosting people from around the world in Madison Wisconsin for  a Skillshare summit. We will design the week to create opportunities for many people doing many amazing projects to share what they do in ways that are replicable.

Here is an invitation to the summit overall.

Here is an invitation to contribute skillshare ideas. We’ll be working through that process over time, this will provide the initial link to throw  your hat in the ring.

I hope you can join us!!

Thanks much
Stephanie


Monday in NJ, Tuesday in Providence!

Hello!

First off, please let your New Jersey friends know about our potluck today –  Monday March 28, 7pm. Two great articles on the subject, in The West Milford Messenger and North Jersey.com.

And tomorrow in Providence Rhode Island we’ll hold a MAN collaboration brainstorming meal and meeting, gathering beginning at 7pmEST and discussion at 8pmEST. If you’re in or around Providence and want to join in person, please email info@mutualaidnetwork.org. If you want to join virtually we’ll begin a web meeting (at gotomeeting, with our standard call-in information available here, at 8pmEST.

After Providence, next tour stops are Detroit then Lansing then Detroit again, for the NASSE forum.

In the meantime I’ll be working to finish my reports for the last few stops of the tour, underway but needing more time for writing. Plus news about how things are shaping up on the MAN front overall, which is excellently!

I just wanted to get this out to you in case you or people you know are in or near W. Milford New Jersey or Providence Rhode Island.

Thanks for reading

 

 


MAN in the St. Louis Post Dispatch today!

I’m pleased to report that there’s a big article on Mutual Aid Networks, STL_article_pictimebanking, and the super cool projects working in both, on the front page of today’s St. Louis Post Dispatch. Hooray!

Featuring the Cowry Collective, Solidarity Economy Network, Missourians Organized for Reform and Empowerment, Grace Hill Settlement House, Dane County TimeBank and DCTB Youth Courts, and much much more. Check it out!!

 


MANs in the News

Hello,P2PMAN

I mentioned here recently that I’ve received the honor of being offered a BALLE Fellowship. Very exciting!

And when I was putting together my Fellow Profile, which lists recent media mentions, I realized we have a bunch of cool media coming out referencing the MAN, and I haven’t yet shared it all here. So here are some recent mentions. Enjoy!

We’re number 8! Top 10 P2P Trends of 2015“The most advanced practical project is probably the Mutual Aid Network in Madison, Wisconsin, which is already expanding beyond the city to places as far away as South Africa (Bergnek project). ” Huge thanks to Michel Bauwens for recognizing Mutual Aid Networks as an important P2P trend.

And, in case you missed it when it was published in July, Michel Bauwens’ interview with me in the series 100 Women who are co-creating the P2P Society: Stephanie Rearick of the Mutual Aid Network.

In November, Madison weekly paper Isthmus referred to MANs as an economic opportunity for artists in this article: Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up to be rock stars: Efforts are underway to help local musicians survive in a tough market

On January 4 this blog was published at Institute for Leadership and Sustainability in Cumbria, UK: The Creative Destruction of the US Prison Industrial Complex: We Can Do It!

And now that you’ve had a chance to see some of the exciting ways MANs can help improve our work and our world, please visit our crowdfunding site, give and share.

We’re extending the crowdfund through the month of March, when I’ll be touring to visit, support, learn from, and document many of our US pilot sites. We’ll use some of the tour stops to launch pilot crowdfunds and to rally support for all our efforts. Stay tuned for details on that later…

Thanks for reading,

Stephanie


Updates – last tour, next tour, more progress on the MAN, money, life, etc

Hello

ecommonyThere’s a lot to write – but there’s a lot of everything to do, so as usual I’ll do what I can and go back and flesh things out later. There’s a lot of video and audio content from various presentations and gatherings to sort through and post, but it takes time and people to do it. You can see the ways I’m starting to flesh things out and seek help with them in the Time For the World 2013 proposal. We’ll soon be making the first informal Mutual Aid Network functional enough to seek contribution of skills and other resources on that platform.

And a lot of what I’m busy with is getting ready for the 3rd and last leg of my Dreamworld Sharing Economy tour, which starts this Thursday! I’m posting details here, but in a (long!) nutshell:

I start with a trip to Chicago, seeing the premier of Broken Fences, directed by my good friend Ann Filmer. Friday we do skill shares and a sharing economy discussion in Evanston, then Trade School Evanston/CTX Collaboration Launch Party where we celebrate the new collaboration between the Chicago Time Exchange and the Evanston Trade School, and I play some music along with other local artists.

The next day a timebank picnic in Lansing, Michigan and that night a show in Detroit at a great venue, Trinosophes, at a benefit for local radio station WHFR. Cool! The next day a timebank gathering, a potluck, that Monday a lunch meeting with Detroit city managers. Wed. I’ll attend the launch of the new Pontiac Michigan TimeBank! Thur. I play in Canton Ohio, Friday I have an evening event with the Kent Community TimeBank, Saturday a daytime training with Kent folks (with Abby Greer!) then a show in Akron that night.

On to Ithaca New York to meet with Scott Morris and other sharing economy, Ithaca hours, Ithaca timebankers folks. Then to Amherst to talk with Emily Kawano of Solidarity Economy Network.

Really exciting things in the northeast – Boston for 2 great events on Oct. 1, Dartmouth for 2 great events Oct. 2, Providence Rhode Island to see the amazing Lisa Conlan and New Hope Care Exchange, a show in Brooklyn Oct. 4, NYC current timebanking practitioners training Oct. 5, new timebank training in Media PA Oct. 6. Oct 7 + 8 I’ll work with the great Kathy Perlow (Lehigh Valley Care Exchange) on making training materials and video about Neighbor-to-Neighbor Care Teams (which we’re making here in Dane County so I really need to know!). October 9 I’ll take a train to Newark and then fly to Istanbul Turkey for GIFTIVAL!

Upon my return I’ll work with Paul Glover (founder of Ithaca Hours and much more) to learn about and document his efforts and brainstorm about connections between cooperative economic models and practices (which I need to learn about as we’re doing this here in Dane County). Then gathering with timebank, Bnote, and other interested folks in Baltimore, doing some events with the legendary Edgar Cahn in Washington DC and nearby, and working with Edgar and other organizers to document community and racial justice initiatives happening there, and create learning materials on the topic.

I play a show in DC Oct. 25 then hightail it to Tampa Bay for timebank events on Oct. 27 and 28, then hightail it to New Orleans for a timebank gathering Oct. 29. Will stay through Halloween, then to St. Louis for a timebank gathering and show Nov. 2.

Then I’ll be happy to return home and buckle down to build our local MANs.

Yesterday I met with a fantastic lawyer specializing in cooperative law. He will help us build a great MAN, one that can easily spin off others at all different scales. We can make it work and he will help. I’ll be working on Articles of Incorporation over the next few weeks and get it going for real upon my return in November.

And all this is in addition to, in support of, and due to the beautiful developments within and around the Dane County TimeBank asIMG_20130908_132014_291 we embark on our PowerTime II energy project with the Allied Community Coop, build neighbor-to-neighbor Care Teams in Sun Prairie, build on our youth court successes by creating our first adult peer court!, connect with more economic tools to increase our impact and improve our sustainability, etc etc. We have a great staff, including Co-Director (promoted from Asst. Director last year) Lorrie Hurckes, who make it possible for me to travel so much this year and who along with our members make all the great stuff happen.

Speaking of making great stuff happen, we had a lovely anonymous donor come through with $10,000 for us, which unlocked $10,000 of our $20,000 challenge grant from Kailo Fund. Hooray! We’re looking for $11,500 more to fund the rest of our year. More gets us more possibilities to commission more work from more people so don’t be shy about giving HUGE amounts. You can donate here to support the tour, or donate to the general Time for the World fund here.

We have a lot of work to do and would love to have your feedback, moral support and/or contributions.

 

Thanks for reading!

–Stephanie


On Good Work

better_worldWhile much of Time For the World’s focus has broadened to be about redesigning work at human scale, and most of the public talks I’ve done over the last six months or so have emphasized this, I realize that I’ve posted very little about it so far. Paradoxically, that’s because work redesign has become so important to our efforts and thinking that it’s taking us a long time to write it all up how we want to. But I want to share some thoughts with you now as we move toward making good work a way of life.

There’s an infinite amount of work to do, to repair the destruction we’ve wrought and build new life-sustaining and regenerating systems and structures. There are not an infinite number of ‘jobs’ to be had, let alone an infinite number of jobs being offered that don’t contribute to the wholesale destruction of our planet and its living communities. Reducing unemployment by bolstering a cannibalist economy is not a worthy goal.

In our experience with economic redesign work we’ve realized that it’s very easy to become heavily tool-focused, obsessing about accounting and currency design while forgetting to evaluate the ends to which we’re designing. We’ve seen a need to continually, explicitly draw attention and design principles to human and community outcomes, and only think about boosting economies if they’re providing good work. Even more important, we see a need to use economic tools to pull parts of life out of the transactional economy and back into the commons.

We’ve recently figured out some ways we can combine various tools and approaches – namely, a cooperative ownership structure, principles of co-production and commons governance, project facilitation training and support combined with timebanking, price-based mutual credit and cooperative saving/lending/investment models – to build a system that pools and allocates resources as an engine for generating and rewarding good work.

Good work should be fun and creative. Good work should provide the opportunity for people to do what we’re passionate about, or simply enjoy, or enable us to take a slower pace if we choose. A good system will create incentives for people to contribute to their communities and commons in the ways that play to their strengths. Peer support in co-productive networks will provide guidance in making cooperative decisions and carrying out successful projects that help people to fulfill their goals, sharing successes and failures for mutual learning along the way.

We think we can design this by doing it. We’ve set up a bare-bones Mutual Aid Network so we can commission work from each other in building an infrastructure, offering each other time credit to start and working toward adding broader resource pooling and exchange mechanisms. And I’ll be meeting with people around the country, during my Sharing Economy Tour, to hammer out legal issues, financial structures, potential partnerships, and learn ways people would like to apply this thinking in the field. We’d love for you to help shape this if you’re interested. Start by signing up at the Mutual Aid Network and we’ll collectively take it from there.

Thanks!

Much more to come

–Stephanie

What are we waiting for?


Sharing Builders Workshop #7: Healthy Community Economy Part II

Hello!

Builders Workshop #7: Healthy Community Economy Part II was a great wrap-up of our explorations, from the Healthy Community Economy Part I workshop as well as the intervening Economic Democracy Conference, of how multiple currency/cooperative economic models could work in concert to achieve powerful community goals. In the Economic Democracy Conference open space Action Summit session we applied this thinking to the outcome of food security.

In Builders Workshop #7 we applied similar thinking and modeling to the goal of reduced fossil fuel consumption.

We had 14 people in attendance. While smaller in number than other Builders Workshops, this group proved to be a perfect size and makeup for the work that we needed to do. I was particularly excited that David Boetcher, an IBEW electrician who co-presented (with Justice Castaneda of MIT Colabs and Chris Meyer of Sector67 co-working space) the New Approaches to Science and Industry workshop at the Economic Democracy Conference, attended and contributed his knowledge of energy systems, surrounding economies and potential partners.

First we gave a slide presentation that recapped and expanded on pieces from Healthy Community Economy Part I.
It’s shared here.

Then we decided to use a case study of a hypothetical community goal in order to see how we might apply different cooperative economic tools to different pieces of the systems we’d need to affect to achieve our desired outcome. The group chose reduced fossil fuel consumption as the focus area. This is what we came up with, sort of a general map of where each piece would be employed to corral various types of resources, finishing with people taking on pieces to research/explore potential partnerships. In the rough maps in the first and second slides M$ stands for Madison Hours and/or price-based mutual credit; T$ stands for timebank hours. The first map was the brainstorm, the second was an attempt to show some chronological representation of how you would develop the project.

As you’ll see from the third photo, we were blessed with participants who offered to carry some work forward! So some of us will be researching existing renewable energy/efficiency efforts, some will research JAK-style bank community saving and lending possibilities, some will be meeting with local businesses to pursue price-based mutual credit and Madison Hours possibilities, and some will be meeting to explore a potential energy project here in Madison.

Stay tuned for further developments…

And follow it all on Build For the World (and post your own projects there – we need to learn from each other!), http://buildftw.org

Thanks for reading,
Stephanie